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Producer: Keshu
Director: Rajkumar Santoshi
Starring: Amitabh Bachchan, Jaya Pradha, Akshay Kumar, Ajay Devgan, Aishwarya Rai, Tusshar Kapoor, Atul Kulkarni, D. Santosh, Tanuja and Special Appearance by Lara Dutta.
Music: Ram Sampat
Lyrics: Sameer
Singers: Arnab Chakravorty, Shreya Ghoshal, Sonu Nigam, Sunidhi Chauhan, Udit Narayan, Sukhwinder Singh, Kunal, Richa Sharma, and Kailash Kher.
Audio On: T-Series
Number of Songs: 10
Released on: October 16, 2003
Reviewed by: Aniket Joshi
Reviewer's Rating: 7.5 out of 10


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Cop films are whatīs "in" these days in Bollywood. Quite a few biggies that will release within the next few months have the police force (maybe more precisely the Mumbai police force) as their central theme. Khakee is probably the biggest of them. Also considering the recent trend of songless films one wonders why the makers didnīt follow that route with Khakee, since Bollywood actioners/thrillers usually get hampered with poor (and more often unnecessary) song placement. Even stranger is the fact that a new composer, Ram Sampat, is brought in to do the soundtrack for this action-thriller. However, Sampat has put in a decent effort for his debut.

Waada Raha is a nice, soft romantic duet that opens the album. Newcomer Arnab Chakravorty (who sounds like a mix of Abhijeet and K.K.) and Shreya Ghoshal breeze through the song with their sensuous rendition. Sampat has come up with an ear-friendly tune and he accompanies it well with the "dafli" and violins. Another version of the song is featured again in the album, however, Udit Narayan replaces Chakravorty. A third, sad version is also featured, and who better to sing a sad version other than Sonu Nigam?

Uppar Wale, sung by Sonu Nigam, Sukhwinder Singh, and Kunal is the theme song. Sampat creates a quiet yet thumping beat that flows really well with the tune. Throw in some motivating and up-tempo lyrics by Sameer coupled with the energetic singing and we have a winner..

Rajkumar Santoshiīs films almost always have an item number; remember "Koi Jaaye To Le Aaye" from Ghatak, "Chamma Chamma" from China Gate, "Que Sera Sera" from Pukar, and "Aa Jaaiye" from Lajja? Aisa Jadoo is the item number in Khakee, picturised on the steamy Lara Dutta. The song itself is pretty catchy and Sampat proves that he can compose all types of songs. Sunidhi Chauhan seems to be carving a niche for herself in singing fast paced/item songs and does her job well here. A remix version is also featured on the soundtrack.

Youn Hi Tum Mujhse Pyar Karte Raho and Dil Dooba are two duets by Sonu Nigam and Shreya Ghosal. Youn Hi Tum.. is easily the better of the two. This romantic number is very ear friendly and Sameerīs lyrics are decent as well. However, Dil Dooba is perhaps Sampatīs only cold turkey of the soundtrack. The beats are very similar to the remix of "Kaliyon Ka Chaman" and the lyrics are also very ordinary. Even Sonu and Shreya, who are very good in Youn Hi Tum.., canīt even manage to save this one. A rap filled remix of Dil Dooba is also featured on the soundtrack, which is even worse than the already hopeless original version.

Mere Maula sung by Richa Sharma (who in my opinion is very underrated) and Kailash Kher is a spiritual cum situational number. The song is situational and very slow to listen to over and over.

Khakeeīs soundtrack is well put together and the credit obviously must go to Ram Sampat, however, he has to be more creative in the future if he intends to be in the leagues of A R Rahman and Anu Malik/Ranjit Barot. On the other hand, Sameer proves that he can be creative only when he is not working with Nadeem-Shravan. Not taking anything away from the quality of the soundtrack, one still wonders how all these songs will fit into a film which is supposed to be a realistic portrayal of the lives of police officers. Do Mumbai cops really sing and dance on lush green mountains?